TeachAIDS software used to teach HIV prevention to more than 250 pre-teens in Zimbabwe. Chalkboard includes illustration of the “Triangle Test”, a mnemonic device developed by TeachAIDS at Stanford University.
22
OCT
2012
Nestled in the heart of sub-Saharan Africa, Zimbabwe is a landlocked country bordered by Zambia, Botswana, Mozambique, and South Africa, a region greatly impacted by HIV and AIDS. This diverse and rich country is home to about 12.5 million people, and has weathered a tense political and social history. Recent challenges in Zimbabwe have lead to crises in food security, public health and, more generally, basic operations.  Currently, around 14% of the population is living with HIV and AIDS, making Zimbabwe one of the harshest hit by the epidemic globally. The country has worked hard towards responding to the crises despite enormous economic challenges.

Remarkably, and thanks in part to the efforts of non-governmental organizations, faith-based institutions, and passionate individuals, HIV knowledge is on the rise, and the incidence of HIV in Zimbabwe declined by more than 25% between 2001 and 2009.

Earlier this year, one program took action, seeking to empower youth to more responsibly inform themselves, and their loved ones, about HIV transmission. Diocese of Mutare Community Care Program (DOMCCP), an NGO working in Manicaland, Zimbabwe, shared the TeachAIDS materials with pre-teens in their community.

HIV educator Raymond Muzondo, who is studying history and international studies at Midlands State University, was tasked to help DOMCCP reduce the impact of AIDS through education campaigns. Armed with the TeachAIDS software, Muzondo brought the prevention education to 252 students (ages 8-12 years old) in the Nyanga district. Muzongo felt particularly benefited by the engagement of the interactive animated tutorials and ease of use with the linear video versions.

The reason why I chose the TeachAIDS tools particularly the animation is that it's interactive so the children get to listen and understand more rather than in lesson format.”
-Raymond Muzondo, HIV Educator, DOMCCP

Included in DOMCCP’s HIV educational efforts were thought-provoking group discussions, which included ICT-based materials. With the success of these programs, the organization plans to expand their knowledge-building activities in the coming months.

TeachAIDS applauds the efforts of Diocese of Mutare Community Care Program for their tireless efforts to improve HIV knowledge and promote behavior change in Zimbabwe.

Photo: TeachAIDS software used to teach HIV prevention to more than 250 pre-teens in Zimbabwe. Chalkboard includes illustration of the “Triangle Test”, a mnemonic device developed by TeachAIDS at Stanford University.