15
MAR
2011
The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has awarded TeachAIDS an additional $34,000 grant to support our development, research, and expansion efforts in Botswana. Since our collaboration with Former President Festus Mogae in 2009, TeachAIDS has partnered with the Botswana Ministry of Education, Barclay’s Bank, SPICE, Stepping Stones, Yahoo!, and UNICEF to implement an initiative to provide our HIV prevention tutorials to every institution in Botswana. This program aligns closely with UNICEF’s goal of eradicating HIV through treatment, prevention, and education, particularly among mothers, children, and adolescents.

Since its inception in 1946, UNICEF has strived to improve child survival and development, increase child protection, and secure free basic education and gender equality. UNICEF has worked to improve the status of children around the world by providing sustained humanitarian relief in the form of advocacy, vaccines, nutritional supplements, and educational supplies. The organization has played a pivotal role in providing vital antiretroviral treatment to millions of mothers and children and has expanded its efforts to include preventative and educational measures. Recently, UNICEF co-sponsored “The World Cup in My Village” project to screen the World Cup games to thousands of Rwandans, in which the TeachAIDS Kinyarwanda Health Education Animated Tutorial was screened during half time for thousands of viewers. As a part of the Unite for Children, Unite Against AIDS Campaign, UNICEF and its governmental partners have worked to eliminate the mother-to-child transmission of HIV in East and Southern Africa.

With the support of UNICEF, we will bring state-of-the-art HIV/AIDS education to 1,066 schools and over 480,000 learners ranging from ages 6 to 24 years old. The TeachAIDS materials will also be made available for free to educators operating in informal learning environments (such as churches, after-school programs, boys and girls clubs, and village outreach programs), and any other organizations operating outside the scholastic environment.